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Geography

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Geography and society

 

Junior Certificate Syllabus       Leaving Cert Syllabus 

 

1. Introduction  

Geography is the study of people and their relationships with their environment. It is concerned with helping to develop an understanding of the physical, social and economic processes which shape the environment.

The education of young people today takes place against the background of a world with such characteristics of geographical concern as

  • -  Increasingly multi-cultural societies

  • -  Sharp social and economic inequalities on a variety of scales

  • -  An increasing pace of socio-economic change

  • -  Growing concern over declining environmental quality in many....

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  • Click here for Syllabus

Geography Trip Report December 2016

 On Friday Mr. Coombes took both of the geography classes in second year on a trip to Irish cement plaitin in Drogheda. When we arrived at the factory we were taken into this room with 2 woman and 2 men and the room had a glass model of the factory in the middle of it. When the woman was talking about the factory we asked her how many more years would the factory still be open for. She said 50 years but at the moment they are finding more limestone so they can extend the life of the factory for the future. The woman also said that they have one of the largest working kilns in Europe. She also said that one of the products that they use to make cement with is found in the Gulf of Mexico. Then we watched a video and it said that cement is the second most used thing in the world except from water then we put on a jacket, helmet and glasses and went out with 3 of the workers, 2 men and 1 woman. When they took us out on the tour bus they told us that they have the second largest quarry in Ireland. But one part of the quarry wasn't dug out but the worker said that the rock is too hard and if they were to try break the rock it would damage there machines. Then we got back on the bus and went under the kiln and then we went back into the meeting room and took of our jackets, helmets and glasses. As we were going out the door the workers gave us all free iPad covers. Then we went back to school for lunch(

Evan maher)

Platin report by Ben Maguire [Elephant P.D's]
On 25th November 2016,Scoil Ui Mhuiri's second year geography group[Elephant P.D's & water-cycle wizards]went to Irish Cement, Platin. Where they learned how cement is made.
What makes Platin so good is how it gets its raw material and how they transport the finished product. It has its own quarry, which is the second largest one in Ireland. Every Wednesday, the gardai come to Platin and help the workers with their "controlled" explosion. The quarry is said to have enough stone left for 50 years. Once the rocks are quarried, they're milled to a powder in a limestone storage facility. When being crushed, Bauxite and Iron oxide are added. The product is then stored in a silo. After that they're taken to a large rotating furnace called a Kiln where the powder is super-heated at 1450 degrees centigrade. The output of that process is called Clinker, which must be cooled. Interestingly enough, Platin uses waste products from landfills to burn stuff in the Kiln. The Clinker is then milled in cement-mills, small-amounts of gypsum are then added. Gypsum controls the rate at which cement sets. Once the cement is packaged it is then ready to be shipped. Platin is close to the M1 motorway so it can be distributed to areas from Belfast to Dublin. Before the M1,Platin used the railway lines which ran through the company to transport its product. Platin makes two types of cement. The difference is that one is an eco-friendly batch, which is now the most commonly used one in Ireland. Who knew that making cement was so interesting

Student Notes

Coastal Features Links

Revise coastal features

Coastal processes, landforms & management

River Links

River Landscapes & Processes


Weather Links
Hurricanes - How they work & what they do.

Weather & Climate